Showing posts tagged
#space

Time-Lapse: Trackers

The Maui Space Surveillance Complex, which belongs to Air Force Space Command, is home to several telescopes that track objects orbiting the earth, such as satellites and space debris.

The complex is located 10,000 feet above sea level on top of Haleakala, a dormant volcano on the island, that is also considered one of the best places on Earth to view space from.

This time lapse sequence was captured over a three-day period by a team from Airman magazine, the U.S. Air Force’s official publication.

How Big Is The Universe?

Beakus were commissioned to create three animated films that explain key concepts about our universe, with humour helping to explain the ‘almost’ unexplainable! Director Amaël Isnard also designed the films.

In ‘How Big Is The Universe?’ ROG astronomer Liz shows us the expanding nature of the Universe and how this affects the light reaching us from distant galaxies, some of which will remain forever hidden from our view.

10 Amazing Facts About The Planet Mars

We’re getting closer and closer to settling on it that it only seems right to learn a little more in 10 amazing facts about the planet Mars.

Music: Epic Event by Terry Devine-King

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The Solar System: Our Home in Space

The solar system - well known from countless documentaries. 3D animation on black background. This infographic videos tries something different.

Animated infographics and a focus on minimalistic design puts the information up front. We take the viewer on a trip through the solar system, visiting planets, asteroids and the sun.

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What Space Smells Like

According to many astronauts, space smells like metal and fuel. Other say they’ve picked up notes of grilled meats. When wondering about the smell of space, who better to consult than an astronaut?

Not that they’ve experienced it first hand, either — space is a vacuum, so they would be dead — but they have taken more than a whiff or two of the residue on their space suits.

It’s generally agreed that the aroma is slightly acrid, but not unpleasant. One space traveler even said the scent took him back to the summers of his youth when he worked as an arc welder.

The smell is mostly attributed to dying stars, traces of which are reportedly everywhere — comets, meteors, space dust — you name it. Not only does the aromatic byproduct of the explosions spread, it tends to linger.

The hydrocarbons responsible for the intensity and breadth of space’s olfactory signature are also found in terrestrial products like oil, coal, and some foods.

NASA has commissioned the replication of the smell, so someday we may all get a chance to breathe in some space splendor.

I’m so going to eat you in…

Astronomical, Brah.
We all know the sun is licking his lips, waiting. The galaxy is the longest of socially awkward party settings. I think I could have improved on Venus, but after about 10 faces I gave up.

(vía kevinnuut)

I’m so going to eat you in…

Astronomical, Brah.

We all know the sun is licking his lips, waiting. The galaxy is the longest of socially awkward party settings. I think I could have improved on Venus, but after about 10 faces I gave up.

(vía kevinnuut)

Could We Stop An Asteroid? (feat. Bill Nye)

Could we stop an asteroid on a collision course for Earth?

Written and created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz).

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The Planetary Society: http://planetary.org

NASA/IBEX Provides First View of the Solar System’s Tail

NASA’s Interstellar Boundary Explorer, or IBEX, recently mapped the boundaries of the solar system’s tail, called the heliotail.

By combining observations from the first three years of IBEX imagery, scientists have mapped out a tail that shows a combination of fast and slow moving particles.

The entire structure twisted, because it experiences the pushing and pulling of magnetic fields outside the solar system.

How to Wash Your Hair in Space [Inside the ISS]

Expedition 36 Crew Member, astronaut Karen Nyberg, demonstrates how she washes her hair in space onboard the International Space Station.

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