Showing posts tagged
#science

Sensory: BBC Wildlife Director John Downer and the Technology of ‘Spy-Cam’ Filmmaking

Exciting developments in camera technology have levelled out of the playing field between the professional and the amateur and so the battle now for programme makers like award-winning wildlife filmmaker John Downer is having to produce something better than the average person.

The difference comes from investing into understanding the behaviour of the animal and devising a way to capture those unique moments, using a huge amount of research, inventiveness and dedication. This has resulted in exceptional and unique technical solutions that tell a story in an new and compelling way.

Discover more about Sensory visual content at :
curve.gettyimages.com/issue/sensory

See more BBC Motion Gallery footage at:
gettyimages.com/bbcmotiongallery

How Home Air Conditioning Triumphed Over the Open Air Movement

Bill explains how the rise of home air conditioning had to battle the open air movements in public school: They regarded it as only for factories where it was first introduced. Only when movie theatres added air conditioning in the 1930 and 1940s did it become popular for the home.

First-Person Hyperlapse Videos [Microsoft Research]

Microsoft Research presents a method for converting first-person videos, for example, captured with a helmet camera during activities such as rock climbing or bicycling, into hyperlapse videos: time-lapse videos with a smoothly moving camera.

Check out the project page for more details:
research.microsoft.com/hyperlapse

How Do Languages Change and Evolve?

Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all?

Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past.

Lesson by Alex Gendler, animation by Igor Coric.

Up!