Showing posts tagged
#science

How Does a Jet Engine Work? [GE Masterclass]

Baratunde Thurston takes you behind the scenes at GE’s Global Research Center to answer the question: How does a jet engine work?

With the help of aerospace engineer Todd Wetzel, you’ll see why “suck, squeeze, bang, blow” is a great way to talk about modern flight.

From turbojets to turbofans, the two discuss how airplane engines have evolved to become the powerful, high-efficiency machines they are today.

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How Does Tylenol Work? The Truth Is, We Don’t Know… [Reactions]

Acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol™, is one of the most popular pain relievers in the world, selling more than 27 billion doses in 2009 alone.

It can reduce fevers, eliminate aches and pains and relieve cough and cold symptoms. But how does it work? The truth is, no one knows exactly. On this episode, Reactions examines the theories about the popular pill.

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Tylenol is a registered trademark of McNeil Consumer Healthcare.

Science: What Makes Tattoos Permanent?

The earliest recorded tattoo was found on a Peruvian mummy in 6,000 BC. That’s some old ink! And considering humans lose roughly 40,000 skin cells per hour, how do these markings last?

Claudia Aguirre details the different methods, machines and macrophages (you’ll see) that go into making tattoos stand the test of time.

View full lesson here.

Spiders Tune Their Webs Like A Guitar

Pluck the silk of a spiderweb and it vibrates like a guitar string, scientists say. By strumming the strands and detecting the vibrations via sensors in its legs, a spider information about meals and mates.

(full story @ NPR)

Science: How The Elements Got Their Names

Ever wonder what all those names on the periodic table actually mean?

There’s a whole lot of fascinating history on Mendeleev’s table. Some carry names from antiquity, some are named for people, some are named for places, and some are named for mythical beings.

Discover the etymology of the elements!

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PicturePhone: How Bell Telephone Lost a Half Billion, But Nearly Created the Internet [Stories of Technological Failure - Part 3]

How Bell Telephone’s PicturePhone, introduced in 1964, flopped yet nearly catalyzed the internet.

Technically, it was an amazing achievement: Bell used the existing twisted-pair copper wire of the telephone network — not broadband lines like today — to produce black and white video on a screen about five inches square. And, amazingly for the time, it used a CCD-based-camera. It was meant to be the most revolutionary communication medium of the century, driving subscribers to purchase broadband lines, but failed miserably as a consumer product costing Bell a half billion dollars.

This is one of three videos in a series on marketplace failures of technological objects.

Up!