Showing posts tagged
#robots
Zombies to Robots Heat Change Mug
This mug imagines a world overrun by zombies… and robots. When empty, this is a plain, ol’ innocent lil’ mug with zombies all over it clamoring for brains. But add hot liquid to it, and a robot uprising occurs! Are they here to take down the zombies? Or to destroy all humans? Only time will tell. Probably best if you keep an eye on your mug, though.
Product Specifications:
Black mug with zombies all around
When you add hot liquid, robots appear
Basically just the opposite of the background on our site
Capacity: 10 oz.
Materials: Ceramic
Not dishwasher-safe
Not microwave-safe.
(vía ThinkGeek)

Zombies to Robots Heat Change Mug

This mug imagines a world overrun by zombies… and robots. When empty, this is a plain, ol’ innocent lil’ mug with zombies all over it clamoring for brains. But add hot liquid to it, and a robot uprising occurs! Are they here to take down the zombies? Or to destroy all humans? Only time will tell. Probably best if you keep an eye on your mug, though.

Product Specifications:

  • Black mug with zombies all around
  • When you add hot liquid, robots appear
  • Basically just the opposite of the background on our site
  • Capacity: 10 oz.
  • Materials: Ceramic
  • Not dishwasher-safe
  • Not microwave-safe.

(vía ThinkGeek)

Armed and Dangerous: Electro-Mechanical Monster

Here we have a giant, mulit-armed, multi-faced, dual-zombie-powered, mercury-activated, electro-mechanical monster!

Materials: Radio cabinets, pool table legs, table top, table legs, coffee pots, pipe elbows, bean scoops, panel meters, truck horns, thread spindles, slide projectors, truck wheel hubs, shoe stretchers, serving tray, chair and lamp elements, mercury switch, water valve handles, motors, LEDs, aluminum scrap, mechanical linkages, etc.

(by Nemo Gould)

RHex: The Parkour Robot [University of Pennsylvania]

RHex is an all-terrain walking robot that could one day climb over rubble in a rescue mission or cross the desert with environmental sensors strapped to its back.

The RHex platform was first developed through a multi-university collaboration more than a decade ago. Graduate student Aaron Johnson and professor Daniel Koditschek, both of the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, are working on a version of RHex known as XRL, or X-RHex Lite. This lighter and more agile version of the robot, developed in Koditschek’s Kod*Lab, a division of Engineering’s General Robotics, Automation, Sensing and Perception (GRASP) Lab, is ideal for testing new ways for it to run, jump, and climb.

By activating its legs in different sequences, XRL can execute double jumps, flips, and, through a combination of moves, even pull-ups. For the tallest obstacles, the robot can launch itself vertically, hook its front legs on the edge of the object it’s trying to surmount, then drag its body up and over. The researchers fully demonstrated this particular maneuver under more controlled conditions in the lab.

More info:
www.upenn.edu/spotlights/robot-jumps-flips-and-does-pull-ups

T8: The Bio Inspired 3D Printed Spider Octopod Robot

T8 is a wirelessly controlled bio-inspired octopod robot made with high resolution 3D printed parts. It uses a total of 26 motors: 3 in each leg and 2 in the abdomen. It is powered by the Bigfoot™ Inverse Kinematics Engine which performs all of the necessary calculations for smoothly controlling the motions of the robot in real time.

robugtix.com
facebook.com/robugtix

Meet ATLAS: Our New Robot Overlord [HD 3D]

Say hello to ATLAS, one of the most advanced humanoid robots ever built!

ATLAS was developed for DARPA by Boston Dynamics. Software-focused teams from Tracks B and C of the DARPA Robotics Challenge will use the robot to compete in the first physical competition of the Challenge in December 2013 at the Homestead-Miami Speedway.

The DARPA Robotics Challenge seeks to advance the technology necessary to create robots capable of assisting humans in disaster response.

For more information on ATLAS and the Challenge, please visit www.theroboticschallenge.org

Introducing The World’s First Mind-Controlled Quadrotor Drone - Mind Over Mechanics

In a jaw-dropping feat of engineering, electronics turn a person’s thoughts into commands for a robot. Using a brain-computer interface technology pioneered by University of Minnesota biomedical engineering professor Bin He, several young people have learned to use their thoughts to steer a flying robot around a gym, making it turn, rise, dip, and even sail through a ring.

The technology may someday allow people robbed of speech and mobility by neurodegenerative diseases to regain function by controlling artificial limbs, wheelchairs, or other devices. And it’s completely noninvasive: Brain waves (EEG) are picked up by the electrodes of an EEG cap on the scalp, not a chip implanted in the brain.

A report on the technology has been published in the Journal of Neural Engineering: www.iopscience.iop.org/1741-2552/10/4/046003/article

Full story: http://www1.umn.edu/news/features/2013/UR_CONTENT_444147.html

Controlled Flight of a Robotic Insect

Inspired by the biology of a fly, with submillimeter-scale anatomy and two wafer-thin wings that flap at 120 times per second, robotic insects, or RoboBees, achieve vertical takeoff, hovering, and steering.

The tiny robots flap their wings using piezoelectric actuators — strips of ceramic that expand and contract when an electric field is applied. Thin hinges of plastic embedded within a carbon fiber body frame serve as joints, and a delicately balanced control system commands the rotational motions in the flapping-wing robot, with each wing controlled independently in real-time.

Applications of RoboBees could include distributed environmental monitoring, search-and-rescue operations, and assistance with crop pollination.

Find out more at wyss.harvard.edu/viewpressrelease/110/

Up!