Showing posts tagged
#retro

"Twin Peaks" NES Style Intro

The FilthyFrackers took a short break from working on the next compilation video to pay homage to one of the best shows of the early 90’s, Twin Peaks.

facebook.com/filthyfrackers

1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 vs 1968 Porsche 911L! [Head 2 Head Episode 57]

On this special episode of Head 2 Head we jump in the way-back machine.

The 1960’s were the defining decade of the modern era. From the Cuban Missile Crisis, to the assassinations of JFK, RFK and MLK, to the hippie counter culture, to a man standing on the moon, few ten-year spans in history have seen as much tumult. Fewer still have seen as many awesome cars.

On this episode we look at two of the most important cars from the 1960’s: a 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427 Tri-Power and a 1968 Porsche 911L.

The Corvette is all sound and fury, with a monster motor that still feels quick today and a soundtrack to die for. The 911, by way of contrast, is the more nimble driver-focused sports car solution, with steering feel that modern cars can only dream of. But one of these two is better than the other.

Watch to find out which!

8-bit Cinema: Se7en

Seven Deadly Sins, Seven Ways to Die… Or is that Seven boss fights?? CineFix presents Se7en, retold in the form of an old school mystery quest video game!

No quarters or controllers required!

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim - A True 8-bit Chiptune

Best version of Skyrim’s theme you can find that is in true 8-bit and in key.

Made by Wyatt Biedermann (ComboverCat).
Made with LSDj on a Game Boy.

soundcloud.com/flamingodomingo

The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim ©2011 Bethesda Softworks LLC, a ZeniMax Media Company.

PicturePhone: How Bell Telephone Lost a Half Billion, But Nearly Created the Internet [Stories of Technological Failure - Part 3]

How Bell Telephone’s PicturePhone, introduced in 1964, flopped yet nearly catalyzed the internet.

Technically, it was an amazing achievement: Bell used the existing twisted-pair copper wire of the telephone network — not broadband lines like today — to produce black and white video on a screen about five inches square. And, amazingly for the time, it used a CCD-based-camera. It was meant to be the most revolutionary communication medium of the century, driving subscribers to purchase broadband lines, but failed miserably as a consumer product costing Bell a half billion dollars.

This is one of three videos in a series on marketplace failures of technological objects.

8-bit Cinema: Kill Bill (Vol 1 and 2)!

CineFix presents Kill Bill (Both Volumes!) retold via old-school 8-bit - and16 bit ;) - game tech. No quarters or controllers required!

You get both volumes in one convenient video cartridge, packed with action and awesome finishing moves.

How Sony’s Betamax lost to JVC’s VHS Cassette Recorder [Stories of Tech Failure - Part 1]

In 1976 Sony introduced the Betamax video cassette recorder. It catalyzed the “on demand” of today by allowing users to record television shows, and the machine ignited the first “new media” intellectual property battles.

In only a decade this revolutionary machine disappeared, beaten by JVS’s version of the cassette recorder. This video tells the story of why Betamax failed.

This is one of three videos in a series on marketplace failures of technological objects.

Up!