Showing posts tagged
#mars

10 Amazing Facts About The Planet Mars

We’re getting closer and closer to settling on it that it only seems right to learn a little more in 10 amazing facts about the planet Mars.

Music: Epic Event by Terry Devine-King

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A Day in the Life of a Fake Astronaut

Kate Greene, crewmember of the HI-SEAS simulated Mars mission, shows us around the domed habitat where she’s been living for the last 2 months.

Read more: blogs.discovermagazine.com/fieldnotes/2013/06/21/video-a-day-in-the-life-of-a-fake-astronaut

Mars Rover Curiosity

Client: GQ iPad - itunes.apple.com/gb/app/gq/id428117848?mt=8
Director: Dan Winters - danwintersphoto.com
Editor: John Aldrich
Sound Design & Music: Shervin Shaeri @ Mutant Jukebox
Photography: NASA JPL, Dan Winters, David Robertson, Travis Smith
Narrated by: Adam Steltzner, Miguel San Martin, Ann Devereaux, Allen Chen

This is a very special project for me, It has been an honour to collaborate with Dan on this amazing project. Mr Dan Winters (danwintersphoto.com) is a renowned photojournalist, creating portraits of luminaries such as Barak Obama, Niel Young, Tupak Shakur to name but a very few, the list is incredible. His work documenting the final launches of Discovery, Endeavour and Atlantis is some of the most beautiful images i have ever seen, it is now on sale on Amazon.

During composing this piece my father was ill with cancer, he passed away just recently and in my own small way i’d like to dedicate this to the memory of him and the fragility and beauty of life.

It has truly been an honour to work with Dan, he allowed me the creative freedom to create as i wanted with little intervention. And of course a big cheers to the Mars Rover Curiosity crew who are inspiring us all with their work.

Shervin Shaeri.

Focusing the 100-millimeter Mastcam

This image is from a test series used to characterize the 100-millimeter Mast Camera on NASA’s Curiosity rover. It was taken on Aug. 23, 2012, and looks south-southwest from the rover’s landing site.
The 100-millimeter Mastcam has three times better resolution than Curiosity’s 34-millimeter Mastcam, though it has a narrower field of view. For comparison, see PIA16103.  The gravelly area around Curiosity’s landing site is visible in the foreground. Farther away, about a third of the way up from the bottom of the image, the terrain falls off into a depression (a swale). Beyond the swale, in the middle of the image, is the boulder-strewn, red-brown rim of a moderately-sized impact crater. Farther off in the distance, there are dark dunes and then the layered rock at the base of Mount Sharp. Some haze obscures the view, but the top ridge, depicted in this image, is 10 miles (16.2 kilometers) away.  Scientists enhanced the color in one version to show the Martian scene under the lighting conditions we have on Earth, which helps in analyzing the terrain.

(vía NASA)

Focusing the 100-millimeter Mastcam

This image is from a test series used to characterize the 100-millimeter Mast Camera on NASA’s Curiosity rover. It was taken on Aug. 23, 2012, and looks south-southwest from the rover’s landing site.

The 100-millimeter Mastcam has three times better resolution than Curiosity’s 34-millimeter Mastcam, though it has a narrower field of view. For comparison, see PIA16103.

The gravelly area around Curiosity’s landing site is visible in the foreground. Farther away, about a third of the way up from the bottom of the image, the terrain falls off into a depression (a swale). Beyond the swale, in the middle of the image, is the boulder-strewn, red-brown rim of a moderately-sized impact crater. Farther off in the distance, there are dark dunes and then the layered rock at the base of Mount Sharp. Some haze obscures the view, but the top ridge, depicted in this image, is 10 miles (16.2 kilometers) away.

Scientists enhanced the color in one version to show the Martian scene under the lighting conditions we have on Earth, which helps in analyzing the terrain.

(vía NASA)

Curiosity’s First Track Marks on Mars

This 360-degree panorama shows evidence of a successful first test drive for NASA’s Curiosity rover. On Aug. 22, 2012, the rover made its first move, going forward about 15 feet (4.5 meters), rotating 120 degrees and then reversing about 8 feet (2.5 meters). Curiosity is about 20 feet (6 meters) from its landing site, now named Bradbury Landing.  Visible in the image are the rover’s first track marks. A small 3.5-inch (9-centimeter) rock can be seen where the drive began, which engineers say was partially under one of the rear wheels. Scour marks left by the rover’s descent stage during landing can be seen to the left and right of the wheel tracks. The lower slopes of Mount Sharp are visible at the top of the picture, near the center.  This mosaic from the rover’s Navigation camera is made up of 23 full-resolution frames, displayed in a cylindrical projection.  Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

(vía NASA)

Curiosity’s First Track Marks on Mars

This 360-degree panorama shows evidence of a successful first test drive for NASA’s Curiosity rover. On Aug. 22, 2012, the rover made its first move, going forward about 15 feet (4.5 meters), rotating 120 degrees and then reversing about 8 feet (2.5 meters). Curiosity is about 20 feet (6 meters) from its landing site, now named Bradbury Landing.

Visible in the image are the rover’s first track marks. A small 3.5-inch (9-centimeter) rock can be seen where the drive began, which engineers say was partially under one of the rear wheels. Scour marks left by the rover’s descent stage during landing can be seen to the left and right of the wheel tracks. The lower slopes of Mount Sharp are visible at the top of the picture, near the center.

This mosaic from the rover’s Navigation camera is made up of 23 full-resolution frames, displayed in a cylindrical projection.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

(vía NASA)

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