Showing posts tagged
#internet

The Empire Strikes Back Uncut: An Amazing Shot-For-Shot Remake In 480 Different Styles (Official Full Movie)

Watch the full version of The Empire Strikes Back Uncut, a fan-made, shot-for-shot remake of the Star Wars classic!

With more than 480 fan-made segments culled from over 1,500 submissions, The Empire Strikes Back Uncut (also known as ESB Uncut) features a stunning mash-up of styles and filmmaking techniques, including live action, animation, and stop-motion. The project launched in 2013, with fans claiming 15-second scenes to reimagine as they saw fit – resulting in sequences created with everything from action figures to cardboard props to stunning visual effects.

Helmed by Casey Pugh, who oversaw 2010’s Emmy-winning Star Wars Uncut, the new film has a wonderful homemade charm, stands as an affectionate tribute to The Empire Strikes Back, and is a testament to the talent, imagination, and dedication of Star Wars fans.

To learn more about Star Wars Uncut and The Empire Strikes Back Uncut, please visit StarWarsUncut.com.

The History of Emoticons [Mashable]

You might think emoticons a relatively new “Internet” phenomenon, but evidence suggests they date back to the 19th century.

Written and animated by Jeremiah Warren.
Design and illustration by Greyson MacAlpine.

(by mashable)

LOLWUT: 16 People Laughing Without Smiling (Vine Compilation)

A compilation of 16 people who laugh with barely any facial expressions at all.

This is a lot creepier than it sounds.

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El último y la caraja que no aguanta y pierde el reto (¿?).

PicturePhone: How Bell Telephone Lost a Half Billion, But Nearly Created the Internet [Stories of Technological Failure - Part 3]

How Bell Telephone’s PicturePhone, introduced in 1964, flopped yet nearly catalyzed the internet.

Technically, it was an amazing achievement: Bell used the existing twisted-pair copper wire of the telephone network — not broadband lines like today — to produce black and white video on a screen about five inches square. And, amazingly for the time, it used a CCD-based-camera. It was meant to be the most revolutionary communication medium of the century, driving subscribers to purchase broadband lines, but failed miserably as a consumer product costing Bell a half billion dollars.

This is one of three videos in a series on marketplace failures of technological objects.

Up!