Showing posts tagged
#internet

PicturePhone: How Bell Telephone Lost a Half Billion, But Nearly Created the Internet [Stories of Technological Failure - Part 3]

How Bell Telephone’s PicturePhone, introduced in 1964, flopped yet nearly catalyzed the internet.

Technically, it was an amazing achievement: Bell used the existing twisted-pair copper wire of the telephone network — not broadband lines like today — to produce black and white video on a screen about five inches square. And, amazingly for the time, it used a CCD-based-camera. It was meant to be the most revolutionary communication medium of the century, driving subscribers to purchase broadband lines, but failed miserably as a consumer product costing Bell a half billion dollars.

This is one of three videos in a series on marketplace failures of technological objects.

Living With Lag - An Oculus Rift Experiment

You wouldn’t accept lag offline, so why do it online?

ume.net, a fiber broadband provider that offers up to 1000 Mbit/s, performed an experiment. Four volunteers got to experience internet’s biggest disturbance in real life - lag.

livingwithlag.com

OpenSSL Heartbeat (Heartbleed) Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0160) and its High-Level Mechanics

There was a devastating security flaw in the OpenSSL implementation of the SSL / TLS protocol (CVE-2014-0160).

The vulnerability occurs in what is known as the heartbeat extension to this protocol, and it specifically impacts version 1.0.1 and beta versions of 1.0.2 of OpenSSL. Even though OpenSSL is just one implementation of the SSL / TLS protocol, it is the most widely deployed implementation.

In this SOC Talk, Elastica’s CTO Dr. Zulfikar Ramzan walks through the mechanics of the Heartbeat (Heartbleed) flaw (at a high level), how an attacker can exploit it, and its underlying ramifications.

It is important to stress that the flaw is not inherent to the SSL / TLS protocol itself, but rather to the specific OpenSSL implementation.

Check out additional SOC Talks at elastica.net

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