Science: Why Does Your Voice Sound Different on a Recording?

Greg Foot tells us exactly why we hate the sound of our own voice on answering machines and such like in this science video.

When we make a recording of our own voice then play it back, we are hearing it more or less as other people do. The sound waves travel as a series of vibrations through the air and meet our ear drum. The ear drum in turn sets three tiny bones vibrating - the incus, malleus and the stapes and they send vibrations into the cochlea. The cochlea translates the vibrations into nerve signals and those are sent to the brain. Why then does that sound so different to what we perceive as our own voice?

When you speak you hear your own voice in two different ways. The first is as above, vibrating sound waves hitting your ear drum. The second way is via vibrations inside your skull actually set off by your vocal chords. Those vibrations travel up through your bony skull and again set the ear drum vibrating. However as they travel through the bone they spread out and lower in pitch, giving you a false sense of bass. Then when you hear a recording of your voice, it sounds distinctly higher and the comparison can be quite surprising.

Glory of Thrones: Tribute to the Hound (Game of Thrones/Peter Cetera Parody)

This is a tribute to Game of Thrones / the Hound set to the music from Peter Cetera’s “Glory of Love” (which you may remember as the theme song from Karate Kid.

Get this track (edited/unedited version) free at thebonecage.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/bonecage

Stephen Hawking’s “ALS Ice Bucket Challenge” is the Only One You Need to Watch (Official Video)

Renowned physicist Stephen Hawking has been living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, for for 51 years; he was diagnosed at age 21. ALS is the progressive degeneration of motor neurons, which leads to muscle weakness, and can result in paralysis, difficulty, speaking, breathing or swallowing, and eventual death.

This awareness was in part due to the viral philanthropy craze, “ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.” The challenge, spread rapidly through social media, and raised over US$100 million for the ALS Association.

This week, Stephen Hawking took the challenge. In his video, the professor urged viewers to donate to the Motor Neuron Disease Association, to help “eliminate this terrible disease.”

(story from Salon)

Amazon Doing What it Must for the Good of Valhalla
This hilarious Norse mythology-themed chat conversation actually took place between UranusExplorer and an Amazon customer service representative. UranusExplorer initiated the chat after his Amazon package failed to arrive. A representative named Thor responded, and the two discussed the package issue in mythological terms as Thor and Odin.
(vía Reddit)

Amazon Doing What it Must for the Good of Valhalla

This hilarious Norse mythology-themed chat conversation actually took place between UranusExplorer and an Amazon customer service representative.

UranusExplorer initiated the chat after his Amazon package failed to arrive. A representative named Thor responded, and the two discussed the package issue in mythological terms as Thor and Odin.

(vía Reddit)

Popping John & Ricardo Walker - Beat It (Dubstep Performance)

Ricardo Walker and Popping John performed an epic dance routine on a dubstep remix of Michael Jackson’s Beat It.

Music: Michael Jackson - Beat It (Mutrix Dubstep Remix)

facebook.com/ricardowalkermjj
facebook.com/PoppinJohnSBK

Up!